Totino-Grace

Academic Departments

The Totino-Grace High School curriculum has been designed by the staff and administration to support the key elements of our mission: learning, faith, community, and service. As educators in a Catholic school, we are committed to providing a learning environment where each student feels supported and is allowed to succeed. When Totino-Grace students combine their required courses with their elective choices they should experience a comprehensive course of studies which will prepare them for whatever they choose to do after high school.

When it comes to academics, the variety of courses offered in the Totino-Grace curriculum opens doors to a lifetime of learning and accomplishment.  With nearly 100% of Totino-Grace students attending college upon graduation, Totino-Grace offers a solid core of college prep, honors, and Advanced Placement courses.

Art

The primary goal of the visual arts curriculum at Totino-Grace is to guide students through a dynamic, hands-on experience where creative problem-solving, critical thinking and quality visual expression is encouraged and nurtured in a variety of course offerings.  Students participate in weekly critiques and learn about art in historic and contemporary contexts to inform their individual expression. Students participate in weekly critiques and learn about art in historic and contemporary contexts to inform their individual expression. For students seeking to further their art study, portfolio development, college art program selection and art scholarship guidance is available.

Fine Arts Department ChairTim Hoffman

ART FUNDAMENTALS
This introductory course explores many ways of making two and three-dimensional works using the art elements of line, shape, color, value, texture and the principles of design; balance, harmony, and rhythm. Projects focus on drawing, painting, printmaking, scratchboard work and 3D clay emphasizing basic tool use, process and concepts. Students participate in weekly critiques. This course builds a foundation for other art courses as well as an appreciation for art. 
Fulfills Fine Arts Requirement
All Student Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit 

DIGITAL IMAGING AND PHOTOGRAPHY
Digital imaging and photography are big parts of our everyday lives. This course introduces students to Adobe Photoshop with its many features as they learn file formats, resolution quality, cropping, noise reduction, color and digital manipulation. Students will learn to make digital files, morph images, enhance digital photos and repair damaged photos. Students will learn about fonts, layouts and visual cues in print and media advertising. They will be informed about the ever changing technology of cameras, scanners and printers. Learning Photoshop will equip students with necessary skills for college work, business application and creative studies. 
No prerequisite  
Fulfills Fine Arts Requirement
All Student Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit 

DRAWING/PAINTING 1
This course explores drawing techniques with both wet and dry media when doing still life, non-objective and hyper realistic works. Students learn contour, gesture, contrast, line quality and surface manipulation that will transition toward an understanding of painting. Painting basics from set up, paint application, brush stroke and glazing techniques to building and stretching a canvas are covered. Creative problem solving is encouraged as students learn to evaluate and understand what makes a powerful painting. Students participate in weekly critiques.
Prerequisite: 'B' in 2D or 3D Art or Art Fundamentals
Signature of instructor
Sophomore/Junior/Senior Elective
1 semester - 1 credit 

DRAWING/PAINTING 2
This advanced course allows students to develop their painting skills and learn new techniques through planning, research, and execution. Student and teacher mutually design a course of study in the form of cooperatively planned projects. Students select subject matter and media choices as they focus on concept refinement. Students will learn painting vocabulary, look at modern and traditional paintings and learn how to evaluate works in weekly critiques. Portfolio development is available to interested students.
Prerequisite: 'B' in Drawing and Painting 
Signature of Instructor
Junior/Senior Elective
1 semester - 1 credit 

CERAMICS 1
This course is designed to give students experiences with stoneware clay. They will learn how to wedge and recycle clay. Using shape, texture and contrast, students will create pots employing traditional hand-building methods. Special emphasis is given to wheel thrown techniques. Students will learn how to use various tools, and how to load and unload kilns for both bisque and glaze firings.
Prerequisite: 'B' in Fundamentals of 2-D or 3-D Art or Art Fundamentals
Signature of Instructor
Sophomore/Junior/Senior Elective
1 semester - 1 credit 

CERAMICS 2
Ceramics 2 will allow students to further their knowledge and experience with clay.  While developing more advanced projects, students will learn how to use new tools and supplies, as well as how to load and unload a kiln properly. Advanced projects will allow students to create larger pieces, matching sets of pieces such as plates or teapots, and experience new forms of glazing and firing. The course will also include a research component, requiring students to write a 2-3 page paper about their final project.
Prerequisite: 'B' in Ceramics 1 or Pottery  
Signature of Instructor
Sophomore/Junior/Senior Elective
1 semester - 1 credit 

STAINED GLASS 1
This one semester, beginning course in stained glass introduces students to the “Tiffany Style” copper foil method as well as a unit in stained glass mosaics. Students learn about safety and how to use the proper tools and related vocabulary terms to complete a project. Working with patterns that each student creates, students learn how to cut, break and shape glass, foil glass and finally flux and solder glass pieces together. Elements of design including proportion, unity, color, and balance are introduced during the mosaic unit and emphasized throughout the course. Personal creativity, and problem solving skills are stressed in the construction of every project produced in this class.
Prerequisite:  'B' in Fundamentals of 2-D or 3- D Art or Art Fundamentals and  
Signature of instructor
Sophomore/Junior/Senior Elective         
1 semester - 1 credit

STAINED GLASS 2
This one semester course is for students who wish to further their stained glass experience. Students should be highly motivated to refine their stained glass skill level including mechanical control and creative craftsmanship.  Students will study glass styles (i.e. Art Deco, Art Nouveau, Contemporary and Victorian) to understand and appreciate how the art form has changed over the years. Stained Glass II students will also be given greater freedom to construct stained glass projects in this class modeled after a style of their choice with an emphasis on creative personal expression. 
Prerequisite:  'B' in Stained Glass I and Signature of instructor
Sophomore/Junior/Senior Elective         
1 semester - 1 credit

AP DRAWING
This course is an intensive drawing class that requires students to complete twelve drawings that document their process of thinking and creating. They will create a body of related works that demonstrates a thorough investigation of a specific visual idea. They will use different drawing mediums and drawing techniques, and participate in weekly critiques to verbalize/communicate art concepts. By the end of this art class students will complete a digital drawing protfolio for submission. The drawing portfolio will demonstrate a broad range of drawing issues and media. 
Prerequisite: Art Fundamentals, Drawing and Painting 1 & 2
Junior/Senior Elective
1 semester- 1 credit

Business

While taking courses in the Business Department, students will strive to learn best practices that incorporate the Lasallian values.  Courses will enhance learning in global and local business practices, business ethics and technology. Students will be able to utilize their knowledge for personal use and in preparation for business programs in a two or four year college.

PERSONAL FINANCE
This class will help students learn how to manage resources such as cash or credit.  Students will look at long term planning, goal setting and investing as ways to maintain wealth.  The course will include units on careers, budgeting, investing, insurance, credit and consumer rights.
All Student Elective
1 semester - 1 credit 


MARKETING
Students will study product development, pricing, location, promotion and other topics affected by marketing.  Students will study how consumers react to marketing development and will explore their responsibility to work within laws and codes of ethics to insure products are safe and promotions are truthful.
All Student Elective   
1 semester - 1 credit 


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 
Students will study global markets and international business as they relate to running a business. The students will address issues such as human resources, management, trade laws, finance and cultural influences.  Students will create a business plan that addresses needs and wants of people in other countries.  The focus of the plan will be on serving others while producing a product or service that will increase a business's net worth.
Sophomore/Junior/Senior Elective   
1 semester - 1 credit 


INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING 
Students interested in business and the financial aspects of business should take this course. Students will explore the three types of businesses - sole proprietorship, partnership, and corporation. They will complete the accounting cycles in each and will explore automated accounting at various times during the year. This course is an excellent springboard to accounting at the college level. 
Sophomore/Junior/Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit


ADVANCED ACCOUNTING
This course is for the student who plans to pursue more advanced accounting instruction. The course begins with a review of the accounting cycle and progresses to a more detailed discussion of partnership accounting, payroll accounting, adjusting and updating of accounts, income tax accounting, managerial accounting, cost accounting, and corporation accounting. Students are exposed to spreadsheets for accounting applications and the use of computers in accounting. It is recommended for any students pursuing a Business major in college. 
Prerequisite: Introduction to Accounting
Junior/Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit


ENTREPRENUERSHIP
Are you interested in creating and running your own business? Do you have a passion for advertising, project planning, public speaking, or finance? Entrepreneurship encompasses all of these components to successfully building a business. In conjunction with the DECA chapter at Totino-Grace, this course will allow students to develop business plans and put them into action. Students will run or manage one project in the school or community.
Prerequisite: A Business course
Sophomore/Junior/Senior Elective 
1 Semester – 1 credit
 

SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING
This course is designed for students to explore how the sports and entertainment industries utilize marketing in their businesses. Students will compare and contrast the sports and entertainment industries by looking at the marketing mix. Students will analyze promotion, branding, licensing, market research and career options across both industries.
Prerequisite: Marketing 
Sophomore/Junior/Senior Elective 
1 Semester – 1 credit

Drama

Fine Arts Department ChairTim Hoffman

ACTING AND PERFORMANCE 1
This class provides hands-on experiences in the theatre arts with a focus primarily on performance skills.  From the business-minded student, who wants to develop poise and self-confidence in presentation skills, to the performer looking to improve their acting skills, this class will provide opportunities for creativity and expression for all.  Students will engage in a variety of learning activities including theatre games, skits, improv, comedic and dramatic character study, and plays.   The course will culminate with a final performance project.  

Fulfills the Fine Arts requirement.
All School Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit


ACTING AND PERFORMANCE 2
A more advanced version of Acting and Performance 1, this class helps the more serious performer develop and advance their performance skills. Students will engage in a variety of learning activities including theatre games, skits, improv, comedic and dramatic character study, plays and musicals.   The course will culminate with a final performance project of the student’s choice.  

Fulfills the Fine Arts requirement.
Prerequisite: Acting and Performance 1 or teacher approval
Sophomore/Junior/Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

Engineering

The Totino-Grace Engineering Institute will intellectually engage and challenge students with a rigorous curriculum that includes coursework focused on engineering, as well as exposure to the field of engineering through program components occurring outside of the classroom

Visit the E3 Engineering Institute webpage for complete program information. Course descriptions are below.

E3 Engineering Institute DirectorsMatt Thibodeau & Dan Vandermyde

  • Engineering 1 

    This is the first course in a 3-course sequence for students accepted into the Totino-Grace E3 Engineering Institute. Engineering I will expose students to the field of engineering, specifically: what engineering is, what engineers do, and the variety of different types of engineering. Students will learn the engineering design process, and follow it to create solutions to design challenges. Students will also learn some basic CAD skills and some basic machining skills necessary to produce models and prototypes for their solutions. Students will work as teams on design challenges and give presentations of their solutions.
    Only students accepted into the E3 Institute are eligible to enroll in this course
    1 semester - 1 credit 

    Engineering 2 

    This is the second course in a 3-course sequence for students in the Totino-Grace E3 Engineering Institute.   The focus of Engineering 2 is to have students continue to develop an understanding of what engineering is, what engineers do, and to apply their knowledge and skills learned in Engineering 1.  Students will work in teams on four major projects throughout the semester.  Emphasis will be placed on following the engineering design process to come up with creative solutions to challenges presented to them.  Projects will be chosen from a variety of engineering fields, and their solutions will be tested through the use of models and prototypes created through a variety of manufacturing processes, including the use of the 3D printer and laser cutter, arduinos, and fabrication using shop equipment.  Students will also continue to develop their presentation skills on each project and become more comfortable with technical writing.   
    Prerequisite:  Engineering 1
    1 Semester - 1 Credit 

    Engineering 3 

    In this course, students will take an engineering project from conception to completion and present their project to a larger audience. This will involve conceptualizing, designing, testing, modifying, presenting a functioning product or system.

 

English

English Department ChairDave Wareham

The English Department guides students to become critical readers and writers, able to articulate and justify their ideas in writing and speaking.  


Throughout the required and elective English courses, students learn to:

follow conventions for standard written English;
write with clarity and focus;
think critically when analyzing and discussing literature;
read for meaning and understand literary techniques;
understand plagiarism and its consequences;  
confidently deliver a well prepared presentation to a group of peers; and
understand and complete the steps of a research project.

Eight Semester Credits Required for Graduation
English 9: Writing and Speech OR Honors English 9 
English 10: American Literature OR Honors English 10 
English 11: World Literature OR AP Language and Composition
Senior English Electives OR AP Literature and Composition

 

Freshman Courses
ENGLISH 9: WRITING AND SPEECH A & B
This two-semester course introduces ninth graders to fundamental speaking and writing skills. Students learn to respond in writing to poetry, short stories and a memoir. Students also develop their research skills as they gather and synthesize information for both written and oral assignments. Grammar review and vocabulary development are integrated into this year-long course.
Freshman Requirement 
2 semesters - 2 credits

READING PRACTICUM A & B
This intensive reading intervention program provides individualized instruction through teacher-directed lessons and adaptive software for students who experience challenges with reading. The program includes high-interest, leveled fiction and non-fiction texts to develop reading independence. Direct instruction of higher order reading and critical thinking skills and strategies are taught with a focus on rigorous academic writing and literacy skills and practice. Prerequisite: Entrance into this course is based on the Placement Exam and/or recommendation by parents and instructors.
Freshman Elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits

 
Sophomore Requirement
ENGLISH 10: AMERICAN LITERATURE A & B
This survey course acquaints students with major authors and genres from the pre-Colonial period to the present. Literature from a variety of cultures and perspectives will be explored. Students will be introduced to basic literary terms and concepts. Writing includes both reflective and analytical pieces. Students continue to develop research and oral presentation skills.
Sophomore Requirement 
2 semesters - 2 credit

 
Junior Requirement
ENGLISH 11: WORLD LITERATURE A & B
This survey of literature from around the world begins with works whose roots are in the oral tradition and continues to the present. Students compare not only content and style of various works but also philosophical and cultural differences. Students respond to the readings in class discussions and work to refine oral presentation skills as well as analytical and reflective writing skills.
Junior Requirement 
2 semesters - 2 credits

 
Junior/Senior Electives
MYTHOLOGICAL LITERATURE
In this course, students learn that the literature of mythology, in both oral and written forms, is the foundation of every culture. They will recognize the close relationship between the ideas expressed in ancient literature and those in modern society. Students will develop greater understanding and tolerance of traditions and ideas other than their own. Areas of focus include Middle and Near East, Africa, Greece, Western Europe and North America. Students respond to the readings in writing and class discussions.
Junior/Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

CREATIVE WRITING
This course is designed for those students who wish to focus on writing fiction. Students write short stories, poetry, and a short play. Work will focus on development of characters, conflict resolution, endings, and dialogue. Considerable time will be spent exploring the use of figurative language along with other writing devices and techniques.
Junior/Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

21ST CENTURY NOVELS
Students will read, analyze, discuss, present and write about 21st century novels from a variety of genres including realistic fiction, historical fiction, dystopian, fantasy, and mystery. With novels like The Curious Incident of the Dog in The Night-time and The Night Circus , students will research modern genres and explore trends in the publishing industry. Students will be introduced to contemporary authors, exploring writers’ techniques. They will practice close reading skills, develop vocabulary and comprehension, explore literary elements like plot devices, theme, symbol, metaphor, simile, irony, satire, and discuss an author’s intent. They will develop presentation skills and technology skills through the novel of choice unit. Students will learn to pressure write in timed settings and longer instances where they will move through the writing process from brainstorming through final draft.
Junior/Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

JOURNALISM I
Students in Journalism I will explore different types of journalistic writing and produce TG’s online Eagle Newspaper by conducting research and writing articles for sports, news, and feature sections. Journalism I students will explore reporting, interviewing, journalistic ethics and writing reviews, commentaries, editorials, and in-depth articles about current events in our community. With an emphasis on writing clear, concise, and engaging prose, writers will learn to write for an authentic audience. Gathering research and writing articles will be the focus of this semester. The emphasis will be placed on the five w’s of journalism: where, who, what, when, and why? Students will also have a chance to explore photography, work with our online newspaper site, develop infographics, and will learn more about media and mass communication.
Junior/Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

JOURNALISM II
The focus of Journalism II will be editing for style, revising, publishing, and learning the roles of reporter, columnist, editor, and copyeditor. Students in this course will work on refining skills within these positions and the visual and graphic appeal of the online newspaper as well.  Using social media, students will build a readership within the Totino-Grace community not only in terms of student body but also a readership in the Twin Cities and broader communities.  Understanding of the audience of a newspaper and data of online visits will be evaluated to address the questions: What do our readers want to know? What are effective ways to grow our readership? How can we sustain and grow our publication from its infancy to maturity?
Junior/Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

 
Senior Courses
All courses are college preparatory. The instructors of these Senior electives will assist any student writing his/her college essay. 

ADVANCED COMPOSITION
Advanced Composition is designed to strengthen students’ understanding and skills in writing. Students will study sentence structure and grammar rules, use figurative language effectively, and write clear and concise compositions. Assignments will include a variety of essays of comparison, examples, and definition, an annotated bibliography, a commentary and summary, and a persuasive research paper. At least six weeks will be spent on developing the skills associated with writing research, namely, finding reliable sources, creating the works cited page, taking accurate notes, paraphrasing properly, citing sources, understanding intentional and unintentional plagiarism, organizing an argument, introducing sources into a paper, and refuting the counterargument.  
Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit  

PSYCHOLOGICAL LITERATURE
Psychological Literature provides the student with ways of understanding human nature and how personality is determined and influenced. Psychological conflicts and themes found in novels, short stories, and films are analyzed through writing assignments such as essays, research papers, and literary analysis.
Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

ENGLISH 12: LITERATURE, COMPOSITION, & SPEECH
This course will emphasize and further develop the students’ reading, writing, and speaking skills as they transition into their post high school years. Students will examine a number of selected short stories, poems, newspaper and periodical articles while improving their writing skills through summarizing, discussing, journaling, and analyzing the literature. Interspersed throughout the course, the students will review the standard rules of grammar and the effective tools of public speaking.
Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

COLLEGE WRITING
This senior elective will present challenging assignments aimed at a variety of expository kinds of writing.  While some punctuation, usage, vocabulary, and grammar are reviewed, the expectations are that students registering for this course have maintained a B average throughout their previous English coursework since this course's syllabus mirrors that of a college composition course. This course is meant to challenge both the students' cirtical thinking and writing skills. A number of smaller essays (750-1000 words) and one larger research paper will determine 75% of the students' final grade.

Senior Elective                        
1 semester - 1 credit

 
Honors English Program
The Honors English sequence is designed for those students who have a high level of ability in English. Honors English 9, 10, and 11 contain music and art components as they relate to the themes and eras studied. In AP English 12, students prepare for the Advanced Placement Test in English Literature. In all classes, students read, discuss, and write critically, applying the higher level thinking skills expected in all Totino-Grace Honors courses.

Entrance requirements for Honors English:
9th grade:  Placement Exam scores and a writing assessment 
10th - 12th grade: writing assessment and recommendations from English instructor

Criteria for continuing in Honors English:
class performance annual writing assessment

HONORS ENGLISH 9 A & B
This introduction to the Honors English sequence focuses on the idea of "hero." What is a "hero"? Why does humankind need heroes? Students begin with a study of the literature and culture of the Ancient World and end with a study of Shakespeare and Cyrano de Bergerac. Critical textual analysis, expository writing, and class presentations are central to the course, as is a close examination of selected works. Students entering the class are expected to read well and have an interest in reading, writing, and independent thinking. 
Prerequisite: Entrance into this course is limited and based on exam scores and a writing assessment.
Fulfills Freshman Requirement 
2 semesters - 2 credits

HONORS ENGLISH 10 A & B
The second course in the Honors English sequence continues to focus on the question of “hero.” What is the role of “hero” after a person/culture has lost innocence? This course includes selections from Western European and American Literature. Together with higher level thinking, research and writing skills, students are expected to develop strong oral communication skills. Students will write two literary analyses and a research paper and five formal essays generated from novels of the students' choice.
Fulfills Sophomore Requirement 
2 semesters - 2 credits

 
Advanced Placement Courses
AP LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION
The AP English Language and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum, which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text from many disciplines and historical periods.
Fulfills Junior Requirement 
2 semesters - 2 credits

AP LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION
The final course in the Honors sequence continues the intensive reading and writing of the first three years. With an emphasis on critical writing, this course includes selected works from all genres and eras, ancient through modern. Students explore these forms as reflections of and influence on the modern consciousness. Students continue to develop higher level thinking skills through writing, which will focus on compare-contrast papers and literary criticism. Students will be encouraged to take the Advanced Placement English Literature Test.
Fulfills Senior Requirement 
2 semesters - 2 credits

Industrial Arts

Industrial Arts Department ChairKeith Welle

The Industrial Arts Department provides students a hands-on approach to learning the principles of design and production. Through the development of teamwork and interpersonal communication skills, and while utilizing traditional practices combined with emerging technologies, students will be able to conceptualize, design and produce quality products.

WOODS AND METALS
In this course, students become familiar with the materials, processes, tools, machines, and practices of the wood and metal industries. During this course, which is both project and objective oriented, students gain hands-on experience in the operation of machines and tools which are common to construction and manufacturing.
All Student Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

ADVANCED WOODWORKING A & B
Wood working skills learned in Woods and Metals are further developed by the student during this course. Students are required to pass a safety test before working. All projects made in this course must have a complete set of plans, plan of procedure and stock bill. Dovetail, dowel, miter, mortise and tenon joints as well as other advanced woodworking techniques are used during the course. Students also work in wood turning and basic cabinet construction. Safety is stressed at all times during this course. Although most students take A & B in the same year, a student may just take Advanced Woodworking A. Students can take A & B in two different academic years.
Prerequisite: Woods and Metals
Sophomore/Junior/Senior Elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits

POWER AND ENERGY
In this course, students will learn about the various forms of power and energy that exist and are utilized in our everyday lives. This course specifically emphasizes three areas of power and energy: electricity, alternative energy and internal combustion engines. This course combines scientific principles with a hands-on approach where students will apply science to solving problems ranging from electrical circuit wiring to overhauling small gas engines. 
All Student Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

CAD TECHNOLOGY
This elective course in Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) examines the origin, role and methods of communication of the graphic language of engineering and architectural drafting. Students will construct technical drawings and illustrations with the use of a computer and CAD software as well as learn methods of scaled sketching. Students will create original residential designs and communicate their ideas through floor plans, elevations, section views and 3-D models. Possessing ability or experience in Geometry would enhance a student’s performance in this course.
All Student Elective 
1 semester – 1 credit

ENGINEERING CAD
This one semester elective course builds upon the engineering drafting foundations established in the first half of the introductory level CAD class. It is intended to challenge the student in advanced areas of technical illustration and utilize such illustration methods to create original designs. Drawing units include pictorials, advanced section views, auxiliary views, dimensioning, pattern developments and 3-D solids modeling. Students will also be involved in two design projects during the semester.
Prerequisite: CAD Technology
Sophomore/Junior/Senior Elective 
1 semester – 1 credit

ARCHITECTURAL CAD
This one semester elective course examines principles and practices of residential architectural design. The architectural knowledge from the second half of the introductory level CAD class acts as the foundation for advanced architectural study. Students will create residential designs and communicate their ideas through floor plans, elevation views, section views, utility plans, site plans and 3-D model presentation drawings. Students will also construct scale architectural models.
Prerequisite: CAD Technology
Sophomore/Junior/Senior Elective 
1 semester – 1 credit

Learning Lab

The Learning Lab course at Totino-Grace offers academic support for students who experience difficulty in learning. The purpose of the lab period is to provide academic assistance as students work to develop organizational, test taking, and study skills. The Learning Lab teachers monitor students' progress in their many subjects and act as communication liaisons between classroom teachers and parents. The Learning Lab teachers also monitor the Student Accommodation Plans (SAPs) of those students who have them and provide teachers with a variety of methods to encourage academic success for their students.


Qualified students are scheduled into Learning Lab for one period per day.  The Learning Lab class has a small teacher-to-student ratio. Students earn one elective credit per semester for this course and it is not included in a student’s GPA.


Initial placement in Learning Lab is based on qualifying placement exam scores and completion of a Learning Lab application by parents.  Continued enrollment in Learning Lab is based on a student's individual learning needs and academic performance. The Academic Office and School Counseling Services oversee initial placement of students in Learning Lab. For more information, contact the School Counseling Department at 763-586-6302. 


Learning Lab Instructors

Instructors offer one-to-one tutoring in a small group setting, helping students develop organizational, test-taking and study skills.  

IEP and SAPs

Students with an Individual Education Plan (IEP) may be able to use the plan while at Totino-Grace. Student Accommodation Plans (SAPs) also may be written for students diagnosed with a condition that interferes with the learning process.  Decisions regarding acceptance or placement of students with learning disabilities are made by Totino-Grace counselors in consultation with the principal.  

 

 

Mathematics

Mathematics Department ChairsMary Glynn and Deb Fagan

The Math Department seeks to provide each student with a challenging and rewarding math experience.  Since we offer a variety of courses at each grade level, we work carefully with students to properly place them in the courses that best fit their needs.

Each course strives to develop and/or enhance students' critical and analytic thinking skills along with improving strategies for problem solving. The Math Department continually strives to keep pace with current math technology and incorporates that technology into the teaching and learning process.   In addition, each course enables students to obtain the skills necessary to be successful in math courses in their post secondary education.

Students are required to successfully complete six semesters of mathematics. All courses offered at Totino-Grace are intended to be full year courses.  

All math courses except Geometry and Honors Geometry require students to have a graphing calculator. 

Beginning with the class of 2019, the following math sequence will be followed.   

TRACK 1 
Geometry
Algebra 2
Algebra 3
Pre-calculus/Calculus AND/OR Statistics 


TRACK 2
Geometry
Algebra 2
FST *
Pre-calculus/Calculus AND/OR Statistics


TRACK 3 
Honors Geometry
Honors Algebra 2 / Trigonometry
Honors Analysis AND/OR AP Statistics +
AP Calculus AB/CIS Calculus AND/OR AP Statistics +
Calculus 2 OR AP Calculus BC 

+ Students at this level may take two math courses during the academic year

* FST = Functions, Statistics and Trigonometry 

 

GEOMETRY A & B
This course in the elements of plane geometry is designed to develop an understanding of the structures of geometry and their relation to the real world. Students will develop a thorough understanding of the deductive method, strengthen the algebraic skills developed in Algebra 1, demonstrate the ways in which algebra and geometry complement each other, and foster an appreciation of the clear and creative thinking of mathematics.
Prerequisite: Algebra 1
All Student Elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits

ALGEBRA 2 A & B
This course serves as an alternative to Algebra 2/ Trigonometry and is for the students who need additional practice in learning the concepts or frequent review to maintain their skills. It concentrates primarily on Algebra 2 concepts and includes an introduction to both right triangle trigonometry and logarithms.  Prerequisite:  Algebra 1 and Geometry.
Sophomore/Junior/Senior Elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits

FUNCTIONS/STATISTICS AND TRIGONOMETRY A & B
The Functions, Statistics, and Trigonometry course develops concepts of functions, statistics, and trigonometry throughout. It provides materials for students to learn to display, describe, transform, and interpret numerical information in the form of data, graphs, or equations. Throughout the course, statistical concepts are integrated with graphical and algebraic ones through the construction of mathematical models of relationships in data sets. Generating models is facilitated using a statistical package on a computer [or calculator], so that students are exposed to a wide range of models including linear, quadratic, higher-order polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Statistical modeling extends through binomial and normal distributions, and gives students some exposure to hypothesis testing.
Sophomore/Junior/Senior Elective
2 semesters- 2 credits

 

INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY A & B
An understanding of statistics is required in many fields of study. This elective course for juniors and seniors may be taken concurrently with other mathematics courses. Topics include elements of statistics, measures of tendency, introduction to statistical probability, and decision theory.  Prerequisite: Algebra 2/ Trigonometry or Algebra 2.
Junior/Senior Elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits

ALGEBRA 3/TRIGONOMETRY A & B
This mathematics course is for students who wish to continue in the math sequence after completing Algebra 2 or Algebra 2/Trigonometry.  This course is a continuation of the concepts taught in these courses and covers topics from college algebra such as functions and graphs, logarithms, trigonometry, matrices, probability, mathematical modeling and problem solving techniques. 
Junior/Senior Elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits

PRE-CALCULUS A & B
This college preparatory mathematics course is for the student who wishes to continue in the math sequence after Algebra 2/Trigonometry and intends to take Calculus. It begins with a comprehensive review of Algebra 2 and continues into other topics including functions, graphing, and logarithms. It also includes a continuation of the study of trigonometry. This course is a must for students pursuing careers in math, science, engineering, and medicine.Prerequisite: At least a 'B-' in Algebra 2/Trigonometry.
Junior/Senior Elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits

CALCULUS 1 A & B
This beginning course in calculus covers differential calculus. An extensive and continuous review of algebra and analytic geometry is integrated with the concepts of differential calculus in order to give the student advanced preparation for a college Calculus 1 course. 
Prerequisite: At least a 'B-' in Pre-Calculus
Junior/Senior Elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits


Honors Mathematics Program
Entrance requirements for Honors Mathematics:
9th grade: Placement Exam scores plus an additional Algebra Assessment
10th - 12th grade: an 'A' in previous math courses and recommendation of the instructor

Criteria for continuing (semester to semester) in Honors Mathematics: 
'B-' each semester, adherance to expectations and requirements of each course

HONORS GEOMETRY A & B
This course is a full year of Euclidean Geometry with review and integration of algebra topics. It is intended for our most capable and highly motivated math students who have completed Algebra 1.
Freshman/Sophomore Elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits

HONORS ALGEBRA 2 /TRIGONOMETRY A & B
This is a second year algebra course with an emphasis on trigonometry during the second semester. It is designed for students who have taken Honors Geometry or who have been recommended by their geometry instructor.
Freshman/Sophomore/Junior Elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits

HONORS MATH ANALYSIS A & B
This third course in the honors sequence includes the study of pre-calculus concepts and more in-depth study on various sectional topics. Students receive the immediate background necessary for calculus. 
Sophomore/Junior/Senior Elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits

 

HONORS CALCULUS 2 A & B

This course will be offered only if there is sufficient enrollment as determined by the Administration on an annual basis. Honors Calculus 2 is equivalent to the second semester of a college calculus course, and is a continuation of Honors Calculus 1. It covers integral techniques, and the applications of integral calculus including finding areas and volumes of defined regions and solids of revolution. 
Junior/Senior Elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits 

 
Advanced Placement Courses
AP CALCULUS AB A & B
AP Calculus AB is an advanced calculus course to seniors with advanced math skills who are interested in gaining knowledge of differential calculus.  The course includes study and application of differentiation and integration, and graphical analysis including limits, asymptotes, and continuity.  Students will take the AP Calculus AB exam. 
Prerequisite: 'A' in Honors Analysis A/B and signature of Honors Analysis instructor
Senior Elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits

 

AP CALCULUS BC A & B
 

AP STATISTICS A & B
The purpose of the AP course in statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data.
Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes:1. Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns2. Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study3. Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability  and simulation4. Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses
Prerequisite: 'B' or higher in Algebra 2/Trigonometry and signature of current Math instructor 
Sophomore/Junior/Senior Elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits 

Students who successfully complete the course and exam may receive credit, advanced placement or both for a one-semester introductory college statistics course.

Music

Fine Arts Department ChairTim Hoffman

Arts education is fundamental to the healthy development of students’ minds and spirits. Music is a fundamental element to a fully human life.   There is ample evidence that the arts help students develop the characteristics, attitudes and intellectual skills required to participate effectively in today’s society. Participation in the arts can help develop self-esteem, self-discipline, creativity, teamwork and cooperation as well as a deeper understanding and appreciation of the human spirit in relation with each other, one's self, and God.

In order to help students develop as full persons, the Music Department focuses its energy on four prime objectives:  to achieve consistent excellence in performance; to achieve a high level of music literacy; to develop a sense of personal investment in the making of music; and to instill an understanding and appreciation of the values that come from participation in a music ensemble. 

 

CHORALE A & B
This is a non-auditioned choir made up of freshmen and sophomores. In striving for musical excellence the students will work on vocal technique, music theory, ear training and sight-singing as well as preparing music (in three and four parts) to be performed at the choral concerts. Weekly small group lessons, which are part of the curricular requirement, enhance the learning process and help ensure a quality music education. Course Requirement: Attendance is required at the Fall, Christmas, Mid-winter and Spring Pops concerts. 
Fulfills Fine Arts Requirement
Freshman/Sophomore Elective  
2 semesters - 2 credits

CONCERT CHOIR A & B
This is a non-auditioned choir open to juniors and seniors. This top curricular choir works to build and maintain a tradition of musical excellence. They perform at four major choral concerts in addition to a few other performances (i.e. the North Suburban Choral Festival and Graduation). Additionally, the students will continue to work on music theory, ear training, sight-singing and vocal technique. Weekly small group lessons, which are part of the curricular requirement, help ensure personal success in the classroom.Course Requirement: Attendance is required at the Fall, Christmas, Midwinter and Spring Pops concerts, North Suburban Choral Festival and Graduation.
Fulfills Fine Arts Requirement
Junior/Senior Elective  
2 semesters - 2 credits

CONCERT BAND A & B
Concert Band is an all ninth grade instrumental performing ensemble that seeks excellence in performance through concentrated development of musical skills. Skills taught in this course include tone production, rhythmic understanding, instrumental technique, musicality, and beginning music theory. Course Requirement:  Attendance is required at four Fall athletic events, four major concerts, conference and state band festivals during the year and Graduation.
Fulfills Fine Arts Requirement
Freshman Elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits

SYMPHONIC BAND A & B
Symphonic Band is an advanced instrumental performing ensemble that continually seeks excellence in performance. Students continue to develop their musical skills through private lessons, small and large group rehearsals, solo and ensemble opportunities, music theory, and music history as well as a biennial performance tour.Course Requirement: Attendance is required at four Fall athletic events, four major concerts and conference and state band festivals during the year and Graduation.
Fulfills Fine Arts Requirement
Sophomore/Junior/Senior Elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits


Honors Music Program
HONORS CONCERT CHOIR A & B
Honors Concert Choir is open to select seniors currently enrolled in the choral program. In addition to participation in the activities of the Concert Choir, students will regularly do work in music theory, music history, and repertoire study. Additionally, students will have assignments/activities focusing on other varying topics which may include music critique, music advocacy, conducting, anatomy of the singer and off-campus concert attendance. Weekly group lessons, which are part of the curricular requirement, help ensure success in the advanced studies.Course Requirement: Attendance is required at the Fall, Christmas, Midwinter and Spring Pops concerts, North Suburban Choral Festival and Graduation.
Prerequisite: Interview with instructor
Senior Elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits

HONORS SYMPHONIC BAND A & B
Honors Symphonic Band is open to select seniors currently enrolled in the instrumental program. In addition to participation in the activities of the Symphonic Band, students will regularly do work in music theory, music history, and repertoire study. Additionally, students will have assignments/activities focusing on other varying topics which may include the value of music, music composition, conducting, and off-campus concert attendance.Course Requirement: Attendance is required at four Fall athletic events and four major concerts during the year and Graduation.
Prerequisite: Interview with instructor
Senior Elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits

Physical Education / Health

Department ChairJoe Rodriguez

All students must take Health, Physical Education I and one Physical Education II course. Students have Physical Education II course options from which to choose. All Physical Education classes are graded A-F and are included in the cumulative GPA.


PHYSICAL EDUCATION I
Physical Education I focuses on developing and maintaining healthy levels of cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and coordination. These goals are accomplished through cardiovascular conditioning and various individual and team activities. These activities may include: tennis, track and field, indoor soccer, horseshoes, weight training, volleyball, basketball, step aerobics, cross country skiing, frisbee, floor hockey, lacrosse, speedball, pickleball, and softball. 
Freshman Requirement 
1 semester - 1 credit

PHYSICAL EDUCATION II ACTIVITIES/MEN
PHYSICAL EDUCATION II ACTIVITIES/WOMEN
This course focuses on skill development and activity at an advanced level: tennis, track and field, indoor soccer, speedball, pickleball, volleyball, basketball, step aerobics, recreational games, cross country skiing, ultimate frisbee, floor hockey, and softball. 
Sophomore Requirement 
1 semester - 1 credit

PHYSICAL EDUCATION II CONDITIONING
This course is designed to give students a broad knowledge of human physiology and biomechanics as it relates to the field of strength and conditioning.  Students will learn how to lift weights and properly train their cardiovascular system to enhance athletic performance and utilize their knowledge to improve their health and wellness throughout school and beyond.  Physical Education II Strength and Conditioning is graded A-F and is included in the cumulative GPA.
Sophomore Requirement 
1 semester - 1 credit

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 11/12
This elective course offers the student the opportunity to attain higher skill levels in lifetime fitness activities. Coeducational activities may include the following: boomerang throwing, golf, tennis, bowling, volleyball, team handball, touch football, basketball, ultimate frisbee, over the line softball, speedball, pickleball, downhill skiing, and recreational sports. A short research paper is required. The topic of the paper is subject to the approval of the instructor and is to be written on a sport or activity that is new to the student. 
Junior/Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING I
Students will learn how to maximize power development using various Olympic Lifts and their progressions.  Students will also learn how to improve their speed, agility, and quickness.  In addition, students will gain a broad knowledge of sports nutrition to maximize athletic performance and recovery.  Strength & Conditioning I is graded A-F and is included in the cumulative GPA.
Junior/Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING II
This course is designed to expand on knowledge gained from Strength and Conditioning I.  Students in this class will apply their knowledge to create programs geared to further enhance overall athletic development and learn strategies to decrease the risk of injury in sport.   In addition, students will learn how to take their performance to the next level with specific sports nutrition strategies to promote athletic development and enhance recovery.   Strength & Conditioning II is graded A-F and is included in the cumulative GPA
Prerequisite: Strength and Conditioning I.
Junior/Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit  

WOMEN'S WELLNESS
Through exposure to a wide variety of activities, students will gain the necessary knowledge to understand the importance of, and make educated decisions about leading and maintaining a healthy lifestyle.  Students will participate in a variety of lifelong physical activities, which will include cardiovascular, strength, and flexibility exercises.  Students will also learn about health issues specifically of concern for females through a variety of different classroom lessons and activities.   
Junior/Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

HEALTH
This course focuses on helping students adjust and adapt to the challenges of adolescence. Life skills and decision-making skills form the core of this course. Students apply these skills in making choices on health and lifestyle issues. Major topics include A Healthy Foundation, First Aid/CPR, Drugs, Mental and Emotional Health, Diseases and Disorders, Growth and Development, and Nutrition.
Fulfills Health Requirement 
1 semester - 1 credit 

THINKING, LEARNING, COMMUNICATING
This course will introduce students to concepts that will help them to be successful in high school and post-high school.  It is designed to deal primarily with three concepts: thinking, learning and communicating. Some of the learning skills include: becoming more organized, goal setting, and developing study skills. Thinking and learning skills activities include expanding one's comfort zone, becoming more aware of other people's opinions, developing motivation and exploring one's own emotional intelligence.  Communicating skills include learning how to resolve conflict, understanding non-verbals, and making decisions.  This course will also help students create a sense of respect for themselves and others, gain an honest appreciation for the differences of others, and develop a sense of responsibility for the community.
Freshman/Sophomore Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

INTRO TO SPORTS MEDICINE
This course provides an opportunity for the study and application of the components in sports medicine.  Students will be introduced to sports medicine related careers, prevention of athletics injuries, recognition, evaluation and immediate care of athletic injuries, taping and wrapping techniques commonly used in sports medicine.
Junior/Senior Elective   
1 semester -  1 credit 

Religion

Religion Department ChairHolly Hoey-Germann

Rooted in the Gospel and the tradition of our founders, Saint Jean Baptiste De La Salle and Blessed Theresa Gerhardinger, the Religion Department invites students to experience God’s unconditional love and be disciples of Christ in the world.  We challenge students to make their faith living, conscious, and active.  Students will articulate the Catholic understanding of Scripture, Tradition, Liturgy, Sacraments, Prayer, Moral Decision-making, and Social Responsibility in a pluralistic society.  We strive to enrich the faith of students at their particular stage of development, complementing the role of the parish and family.

Students will…

Understand God’s unique love for them through the life and mission of Jesus

be nourished and sustained through prayer and the sacraments

articulate the Catholic understanding of Scripture and Tradition

be able to discuss matters of faith and religion in an authentic and respectful manner

grow in faith through the examples of the School Sisters of Notre Dame and the Lasallian Community

discern their spiritual gifts and how God calls them to live out these gifts in the world

 

Eight Semester Credits Required for Graduation:

Grade 9: Introduction to the Bible and Living in Jesus Christ

Grade 10: Church History and Sacraments: Experiencing the Paschal Mystery

Grade 11: Christian, Catholic, Charism and Morality

Grade 12: Two Senior Electives

 

Freshman Requirements
INTRODUCTION TO THE BIBLE
The purpose of this course is to give students a general knowledge and appreciation of the Sacred Scriptures. Through their study of the Bible they will come to encounter the living Word of God, Jesus Christ. In the course they will learn about the Bible, authored by God through Inspiration, and its value to people throughout the world. Students will continue to learn how to read the Bible and will become familiar with the major sections of the Bible and the books included in each section. Students will pay particular attention to the Gospels, where they may grow to know and love Jesus Christ more personally. Freshman Requirement 1 semester - 1 credit

LIVING IN JESUS CHRIST
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the mystery of Jesus Christ, the living Word of God, the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity. In this course students will understand that Jesus Christ is the ultimate Revelation to us from God. In learning about who he is, the students will also learn who he calls them to be. 
Freshman Requirement 
1 semester - 1 credit 


Sophomore Requirements
SACRAMENTS: EXPERIENCING THE PASCHAL MYSTERY
Through this course students will learn that they share in the redemptive life of Jesus Christ. Christ won this redemption through the Paschal Mystery: his life, suffering, death, resurrection, ascension, and glorification. Through the exploration of this central mystery and a deep examination of the sacraments, especially Eucharist, students will understand their invitation into the life of Christ.

Sophomore Requirement 
1 semester - 1 credit

CHURCH HISTORY
This class is designed to be a survey of the history of the top moments and movements in our Church from the Apostolic age to the modern age.  Students will discover various models of church by examining key people and events.  Through the general knowledge of Church’s history students see how the Church was founded by Christ through the Apostles and sustained through the Holy Spirit.  Students will come to understand the Church is the living Body of Christ today and has both Divine and human elements. Students will understand their role as active members in the Body of Christ.

Sophomore requirement

1 semester - 1credit

 

Junior Requirements
CHRISTIAN, CATHOLIC, CHARISM
Through this course students will learn their particular place within the global Christian community. Exploring what it means to be Christian, Catholic, and in a community with two founding religious orders, students will come to a deeper understanding of the origins and mission of the Christian faith, the particular ways that the Catholic Church embodies that faith and mission, and the unique contribution of the religious orders that founded Totino-Grace. This course will include elements of church history, ecclesiology, and the study of discipleship. Important figures of the Lasallian community and School Sisters of Notre Dame will serve as examples of lives inspired by the mission of Christ.
Junior semester requirement
1 semester-1 credit

CHRISTIAN MORALITY
The purpose of this course is to help students understand that through Christ they can fully live out God’s plan for their lives. Students will learn the moral concepts and tenets that shape the lives of Christ’s disciples as individuals and as members of society. They will be introduced to the Christian moral tradition rooted in the example of Jesus, including: good and evil, virtue and vice, forgiveness and sin, freedom and responsibility guided by the Ten Commandments, the Beatitudes, and the Principles of Catholic Social Teaching.
Junior/Senior requirement
1 semester-1 credit 

Senior Requirement
Two electives are required senior year; one each semester. 

 
Senior Electives
SERVICE AND JUSTICE
Through this course students will deepen and broaden their understanding of the Church’s social teaching. Students will learn how Christ’s concern for others, especially the poor and vulnerable, is present today in the Church’s social teaching and mission. Learning about the cycles of poverty and injustice that keep people oppressed, students will discern their role in service to others. Using the model of service-learning each student must complete a minimum of 20 hours of service at one agency serving people who are disenfranchised or marginalized.  Students will reflect and apply their work to the Church’s social teaching. Students culminating class project will be to advocate for a specific justice issue.
Senior elective 
1 Semester - 1 credit 

HONORS PHILOSOPHY OF GOD
This honors course is a survey of the history of western philosophy, particularly focused on the philosophical attempts to explain the origins and purpose of the universe and the philosophical “proofs” for the existence of God. The first quarter of the course will take a historical perspective through the reading of the novel Sophie’s World. The second quarter will examine God’s existence and two practical applications of faith in God, Viktor Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning and Pope John Paul II’s Crossing the Threshold of Hope. The student taking this course will come away with a deeper knowledge and appreciation of philosophy and its importance for being able to better understand the basic principles of Catholic Christian theology.Note: This course is especially recommended for those planning to take Honors Introduction to Theology as Seniors.
Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

CHRISTIAN SPIRITUALITY
One of the tasks of every Christian is to develop a life of prayer and meditation. To this end, this course will examine the spiritual lives of some of the great saints and mystics as well as contemporary spiritual practices. It seeks to provide a foundation in the Catholic tradition and give students some practical help in exploring their own spirituality. The course will include reading, writing, journaling, and meditation.
Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

WORLD RELIGIONS
This course introduces the subject of religion through a comparative study of the primary forms of religious expression, such as sacred community, rites, symbols, and stories. These themes will be analyzed within the context of each of the major religious traditions of the world. This study will allow the students to compare a wide range of religious phenomena from many different religious traditions. It will also help the students appreciate the uniqueness of their own Christian/Catholic tradition as well as deepen their own commitment to the tradition.
Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

ADVANCED SCRIPTURE
Building on scriptural lessons from previous courses, students will further investigate the principles for understanding and interpreting Scripture.  Through their studies, students will appreciate the purpose and religious significance of Scripture in the Jewish and Christian traditions and recognize the unity of the narrative throughout the Old and New Testaments. Students will immerse themselves in Sacred Scripture and make connections between their learning and their personal faith lives.
Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

VOCATIONS
Through this course students will study the Christian life and the process of discerning their vocational call.  Students will learn how all vocations are similar and how they differ. The course will be structured around married life, single life, priestly life and consecrated life. Students will study the uniqueness of marriage, the changing roles of men and women, communication and conflict resolution, family planning and sexuality.
Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

HONORS INTRODUCTION TO THEOLOGY
This honors course is for students with a heightened interest in religious topics. Students explore their knowledge of theology and read various theological books and materials to broaden their understandings of our Catholic-Christian tradition and what we believe. Because college credit may be earned through this course, students are expected to read and discuss at a college level as well as write a research paper on a topic chosen by the individual student. Note: Qualified students may take this course for college credit through St. Mary's University of Minnesota. Prerequisite: Student interest, self-motivation, and theological curiosity. Minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA.
Senior Elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

Scholars

Murphy Scholars DirectorCheri Broadhead

Scholars Research Seminar
In this second semester, Junior year course, students will complete their Capstone Projects for the KMSP program.  Students will be engaged in scholarly research, analyzing sources, developing a strong thesis, conducting interviews, proofing papers and completing their essays.  Students will also continue to develop their speaking skills by listening to and critiquing speeches from outside sources as well as from their peers.
1 semester - .5 credits

Science

Science Department ChairJim Dahlman

The Science Department offers a coordinated three-year course sequence of Physics, Chemistry and Biology where one subject becomes the foundation for the next.  The focus of the curriculum is on critical thinking and problem solving skills that are developed through laboratory and other investigative activities.  

The curriculum allows students to begin their high school science experience with a hands-on, real-world approach that teaches them problem solving techniques.  The courses are developmentally more rigorous each year and allow students to build and construct their science knowledge in a way that demonstrates the fact that all sciences are related. By senior year, students may choose advanced science courses according to their interests.  

The science curriculum is integrated so students develop deeper intellectual connections between and among the sciences, develop a deeper appreciation for the unity and diversity of life, and have a strong preparation for college.

 

PHYSICS A & B
This course introduces the student to the scientific method, measurement, the SI system, graphing and laboratory report writing. Topics include vectors, velocity, acceleration, Newton’s Laws, forces, energy, momentum, machines, a brief introduction to fluid dynamics, waves, sound, light, color, reflection, refraction, lenses, and electricity and magnetism. This course is a prerequisite to all other Totino-Grace science courses. 
Fulfills Freshman Requirement 
2 semesters - 2 credits 

 

CHEMISTRY A & B
The aim of Chemistry is to enable students to develop a better understanding of their physical world. It focuses on the study of matter and how it interacts with society and the surrounding world. A balanced approach is used in combining chemical theories and concepts with quantitative problems. Appropriate lab work will accompany theory. 
Fulfills Science Requirement 
2 semesters - 2 credits 

 

BIOLOGY A & B
This course examines the biochemistry of life that occur within cells. Students will study cell organelles and their functions, the chemical aspects of photosynthesis and respiration, the principles of heredity and microbiology as well as an introduction to biotechnology. This course introduces the student to the features of protist, fungus, plant and animal kingdoms and the concepts of ecology. Emphasis is placed on an appreciation for life as well as understanding of human beings in relation to their environment. A study of human body systems is also included. 
Fulfills Science Requirement 
2 semesters - 2 credits 

Junior/Senior Science Electives
NOTE: Some courses may be taken Junior or Senior year. This means that interested and highly motivated students may be willing to take a year-long Biology course their Junior year along with another science elective.  

 

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE
This is a one semester course in computer programing skills which introduces students to the programming language Python. Students learn to write functions and algorithms to solve real world problems. Students use logic to design, implement, run and debug computer programs.  The course focuses on the foundational computer science concepts that control modern computing applications ranging from website design, graphic design, and robotics.
Junior/Senior Elective 1 Semester
1 credit

 

FORENSIC SCIENCE
This one semester college preparatory course introduces how physics, chemistry, and biology (emphasis in chemistry) can be applied to criminal and civil law enforcement. Students learn how to analyze physical evidence, collect appropriate data, draw reasonable conclusions from experimental results and communicate their findings effectively. Topics include chemical analysis of physical evidence, drug analysis, serology & DNA analysis, crime-scene reconstruction, fingerprint analysis, questioned document analysis and the relationship between science and the law.
Junior/Senior Elective 
1 semester/1 credit

ASTRONOMY
This is a one-semester college preparatory science course in the study of planets, stars, galaxies and the universe as a whole. This course will focus on the study of the physical characteristics of our solar system, planets, and our sun. Students will study the physics of stars and stellar evolution as well as the different types of galaxies and galaxy clusters. Finally, students will explore the general structure, history, and the predicted future of our universe. 
Junior/Senior elective 
1 semester - 1 credit

Senior Science Electives
 

ECOLOGY
This college preparatory course covers the study of plants and animals and their relationships with each other and the outside world. Topics include ecosystems, biomes, land ecology, water ecology, the atmosphere, changing climate, renewable and alternative energy and human population. This course includes a field trip to Rice Creek to collect and analyze the macroinvertebrate community in order to determine water quality. A fee of $6 is required to purchase a lab notebook for the class.

 Senior elective (fall semester)  
1 semester - 1 credit 

 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY A
This semester course studies the structures and functions of the human body. Students in Anatomy and Physiology A will study medical terminology, body tissues, the skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Laboratory work involves microscope use and includes the following dissections: bone sections, skeletal joints, sheep brain and spinal cord, and the cow eye. 
Senior elective 
1 semester - 1 credit 

 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY B
This one semester course studies the structures and functions of the human body. Students in Anatomy and Physiology B will study the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, and endocrine systems.  There will also be a unit on the Biomechanics of Sport where students will research the forces, motion, nutrition, and training systems of the athletes involved.  Dissection of a cat as a representative mammal is a culminating activity for this course. Students who do not wish to dissect the cat may use a virtual dissection program to complete this requirement.  
Senior elective 
1 semester - 1 credit 

 

MICROBIOLOGY
This one-semester college preparatory course focuses on activities of bacteria, viruses and other microorganisms, and their influence on humans.  Students are introduced to concepts of morphology, genetics and reproduction of these microbial agents.  Lectures focus on individual organisms with emphasis on infectious diseases, biotechnology applications, molecular and biochemical characteristics.  In labs, students have the opportunity to prepare media, culture bacteria and perform procedures with practical applications in medicine. 
Senior elective (spring semester)  
1 semester - 1 credit 

Honors and Advanced Placement Science Courses
Enrollment requirements for Honors and AP Science courses: 
9th grade: Placement Exams scores 
10th - 12th grade: An 'A-' in previous science courses and recommendation of the instructor 

Criteria for continuing (semester to semester) in Honors and AP Science:
'B-' average in Honors science courses. Adherence to expectations and requirements of each course. 

 

HONORS PHYSICS A & B
This course is designed for students whose reading and math abilities are well above average, and who want the most challenging preparation for college. Content is covered in greater depth and complexity than Physics A & B, and at an accelerated rate.  Students learn the scientific method, measurement, the SI system, graphing and laboratory report writing. Topics include vectors, velocity, acceleration, Newton’s Laws, forces, energy, momentum, machines, a brief introduction to fluid dynamics, waves, sound, light, color, reflection, refraction, lenses, and electricity and magnetism. Placement in this course is based on student interest, supported by strong Placement Exam scores. 
Fulfills Freshman Requirement 
2 semesters - 2 credits 

 

HONORS CHEMISTRY A & B
This course is designed to follow and build on the concepts covered in Honors Physics. It includes all of the topics in the general chemistry course, but is run at an accelerated pace and includes advanced lab work. It is designed for students who want the most challenging preparation for college. The topics covered include matter, the atom, nuclear chemistry, stoichiometry, reaction rate, equilibrium, and acids, bases and salts. Overall, this course tends to be more quantitative in nature than the general chemistry course. 
Fulfills Sophomore Requirement 
2 semesters - 2 credits 

 

HONORS BIOLOGY A & B
This course will provide an in depth study of biology topics with a greater level of chemistry and physics included throughout. The course examines in detail the biochemistry of life that occur within cells. Students will also study cell organelles and their functions, the chemical aspects of photosynthesis and respiration, the principles of heredity and microbiology as well as biotechnology. This course introduces the student to the features of protist, fungus, plant and animal kingdoms and the concepts of ecology. Emphasis is placed on an appreciation for life as well as understanding of human beings in relation to their environment. A study of human body systems is also included.  
Fulfills Junior Requirement 
2 semesters - 2 credits 

 

AP CHEMISTRY A & B
This course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first year of college. With a sufficient score on the AP exam, college credit could be earned for this course. This is an academic, quantitative chemistry course. Students in this course will gain an in-depth understanding of the fundamentals of chemistry, think critically, and clearly express their ideas, both orally and in writing. Chemistry is the study of atoms and molecules and how they interact according to physical laws. Such study is applicable to everyday life and this will be demonstrated repeatedly throughout the year. Topics of study include structure of matter, states of matter, reactions, descriptive chemistry, and chemical calculations. 
Prerequisite: 1 Year of Chemistry or Honors Chemistry (Honors preferred), Algebra 2/Trig 
Junior/Senior elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits 

 

AP PHYSICS A & B
This course is designed to be the equivalent of the general physics course usually taken during the first year of college. With a sufficient score on the AP exam, college credit could be earned for this course. This is an academic, quantitative physics course. Students in this course will gain an in-depth understanding of the fundamentals of physics, think critically, and clearly express their ideas, both orally and in writing. This course is designed to prepare students for the AP Physics test in the spring. Topics will include Newtonian Mechanics, Electricity, Magnetism, Fluid Mechanics, Thermal Physics, Waves, Optics, Atomic and Nuclear Physics. 
Prerequisite: 1 Year of Physics or Honors Physics (Honors preferred), Algebra 2/Trig 
Junior/Senior elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits 

 

AP BIOLOGY A & B
AP Biology is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory biology course. In this course, students will further develop their understanding of biology through inquiry-based investigations as they explore the following topics: evolution, cellular processes — energy and communication, genetics, information transfer, ecology, and interactions. The course aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. LABORATORY REQUIREMENT: This course requires that 25 percent of instructional time will be spent in hands-on laboratory work, with an emphasis on inquiry-based investigations that provide students with opportunities to apply the science practices.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of one full year of biology and one full year of chemistry and demonstrates enthusiasm and interest in the field of biology.
Senior elective 
2 semesters - 2 credits

Social Studies

Social Studies ChairsDave Theisen 

The Social Studies Department seeks to nurture capable citizens and thoughtful decision makers so that they may understand and engage in a rapidly changing world.  We empower students by emphasizing the skills, knowledge and technological proficiency that are necessary to actively participate in local, national and global communities. We acknowledge that all humans possess an inherent value and dignity, and our emphasis on history and geography provides students with a context for understanding the ideas and institutions that have shaped our collective identity. As part of our mission to prepare students for the rigors of post-secondary education, we encourage students to think deeply and critically about the complex world in which we live.


NEW SOCIAL STUDIES REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CLASS OF 2019 and beyond
Grade 9: Human Geography 
Grade 10: World History A & B OR AP World History A & B
Grade 11: United States History A & B OR AP United States History A & B 
Grade 12: United States Government 1 AND Senior Social Elective OR AP United States Government A & B 

SOCIAL STUDIES REQUIREMENTS
Grade 10: World History A & B OR AP World History A & B
Grade 11: United States History A & B OR AP United States History A & B 
Grade 12: United States Government 1 AND Senior Social Elective OR AP United States Government A & B

 

Freshman Requirement
HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Human geography will introduce the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped  human understanding, use, and alteration of the Earth. Students will learn spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine social organizations and environmental changes. Student will also use geographer’s tools and methods.
Fulfills Freshman Requirement 
1 semester - 1 credit


Required Courses - Classes 2016-2018
WORLD HISTORY A & B
This course concentrates on the history, geography and geographical implications of modern politics and international affairs. During first semester the focus will be on Western Civilization and the transformation of Western culture throughout history. During second semester students will learn about specific regions and cultures of the world. Throughout the course there is analysis of social, economic and cultural problems in the world and an emphasis on geography.
Sophomore Requirement 
2 semesters - 2 credits

UNITED STATES HISTORY A & B
This course is a one-year survey course of US History from Colonial America through the 1990’s.  With an emphasis on primary source sources and developing analytical skills, students learn about political, economic, religious and social developments that have shaped the United States and connections are made to help students better understand the current status of the United States and how the past relates to the future.  
Junior Requirement 
2 semesters - 2 credits

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT
This course examines our United States government and the principles of the U.S. Constitution. It is designed to further citizenship in our students. The three branches of government, political parties, voting and elections, taxes and budget and civil liberties are among the topics covered.
Senior Requirement 
1 semester - 1 credit 

Junior/Senior Electives
All Seniors (except those enrolling in AP United States Government A & B) must select one of the following courses to fulfill the Senior Social Studies elective requirement:

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
This course looks at modern international politics, economics, social organization and patterns of thought. It is a discussion course dealing with current world problems designed to permit analysis of the role of present day American values in the modern international world.
Fulfills Senior Requirement 
1 semester - 1 credit

CONSTITUTIONAL AND CRIMINAL LAW
Learn about the legal system: trials, rights of the accused, court structure, punishment (prisons, the death penalty), and Constitutional issues. This course investigates current and historic hot legal topics and investigates the procedures of the Courts throughout the United States.
Fulfills Senior Requirement 
1 semester - 1 credit

ECONOMICS
This course emphasizes analysis of the American economic system as it relates to the individual and other economic systems. Specific units will cover microeconomic issues such as the law of supply and demand, factors of production, and the business cycle. Macroeconomic issues will include money and banking, monetary and fiscal policy, international trade and comparative economic systems. We will be touching on the history of economic thought as well as current economic issues.
Fulfills Senior Requirement 
1 semester - 1 credit

WORLD MILITARY HISTORY
This course follows the history of warfare from its beginnings in the ancient world up to modern times. It is a lecture/discussion course that will also include one required novel and one novel chosen by the individual student. The emphasis will be on the great battles, commanders, and technologies that have helped to shape the modern world. Emphasis will be placed on participation in class discussions and individual/group research.
Fulfills Senior Requirement 
1 semester - 1 credit

AMERICAN STUDIES SENIOR SEMINAR
This course focuses on issues facing the U.S. Today. The course will dive into the great debates of the day (e.g. immigration, health care reform, tax policy, race relations etc.) and look at them through the framework of the U.S. Constitution. Students will discuss the role of the federal government in addressing the issues of the day. Students will also discuss issues of civil liberties in 21st Century America. The course will also introduce the principals of microeconomics including scarcity, the market system (supply and demand), financial markets, monetary policy, and fiscal policy. 
Fulfills Senior Requirement 
1 semester - 1 credit 

PSYCHOLOGY
 This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior.  Topics 
include cognition, learning and memory, perception and sensation, emotions and 
motivation, social psychology, abnormal psychology, developmental psychology, 
and neuroscience and the biology of the brain.
Fulfills Seniors Requirement
1 semester- 1 credit

AP Social Studies Courses
The Social Studies Department offers two courses through the College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Program. These courses are designed to provide a college-level course focused in the area of study and participants are encouraged to take the AP Exam at the end of the year. Depending on the score earned on the exam, the student has the opportunity to earn college credit at most colleges and universities in the U.S. and many abroad.

AP WORLD HISTORY A & B
This course is an intensive survey of World History from approximately 8000 B.C.E. to the Present. Students will focus upon primary source readings and the writing of critical essays in preparation for the Advanced Placement Exam in the spring. The reading and writing load will be considerable and prospective students should have a strong interest in the History of the World. Students must register for both A & B semesters.
Fulfills Sophomore Requirement 
2 semesters - 2 credits  

AP UNITED STATES HISTORY A & B
This course is an intensive survey of United States History from Exploration/Discovery to Present Day. Students will focus upon primary source readings and the writing of critical essays in preparation for the Advanced Placement Exam in the spring. The reading and writing load will be considerable and prospective students should have a strong interest in the history of the United States. Students must register for both A & B semesters.
Fulfills Junior Social Studies requirement 
2 semesters - 2 credits

AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT A & B
This course is designed to provide the student with a college-level introduction into the Government of the United States. The course will focus upon the institutions, politics, and policies that constitute our democratic system. Prospective students will be expected to be highly engaged in matters concerning government and politics. Students must register for both A & B. Entrance into this course is limited.Entrance exam required.
Fulfills all Senior Social Studies requirements 
2 semesters - 2 credits

College Board CLEP Exam Prep Courses
The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) gives students the opportunity to receive college credit by earning a qualifying score on College Board CLEP examinations. More than 2,900 accredited colleges and universities award credit for satisfactory scores on CLEP exams. 

The following Senior Social Studies electives prepare students to take the corresponding CLEP examinations:
Constitutional and Criminal Law: American Government CLEP Exam
Sociology: Introductory Sociology CLEP Exam

World Languages

World Languages Department ChairNora Flom

Beginning with the Class of 2018, two years of a world language are required. Students are not required to begin their study of a world language during their freshman year. 
 
The mission of the World Languages Department is to develop future world citizens and leaders. In our multi-cultural world, proficiency in another language, knowledge of other cultures and an awareness of our differences will enhance one’s professional as well as personal life. In order to accomplish this we encourage students to begin language study in ninth grade. College requirements for world language study vary, but the best preparation in high school is three to four years of a single world language. Students who register for a World Language must register for a full year. Students should have a good understanding of basic English.

 

Levels 1 & 2
CHINESE 1 A & B
CHINESE 2 A & B
FRENCH 1 A & B and FRENCH 2 A & B
SPANISH 1 A & B and SPANISH 2 A & B

While studying Levels 1 and 2, the student will:

Use and comprehend everyday phrases needed in a variety of social situations.
Use, in oral and written forms, the basic grammatical patterns of the language.
Develop an appreciation for the culture of the various countries.
Be involved in activities using the language.
Read, listen to, and discuss short selections in the language.
Develop responsibility for his/her own learning.
Investigate how languages enhance one's life and career opportunities. 
2 semesters - 2 credits each year

Levels 3 & 4

CHINESE 3 A & B and CHINESE 4 A & B
FRENCH 3 A & B and FRENCH 4 A & B
SPANISH 3 A & B and SPANISH 4 A & B
With Levels 1 and 2 as a foundation, the Level 3 and 4 student will:

Participate in intensive oral work in the language.
Read and discuss a variety of literature such as short stories, poems, novels, tales, plays, newspaper and magazine articles and anecdotes.
Write formally and informally in a variety of formats such as letters, e-mails, journals, summaries, and essays.
Study and experience the culture.
Investigate the value of language in the workplace.
Be encouraged to participate in local activities which offer a better understanding of the language and/or culture.
Prepare for college tests in order to be able to meet the entrance and graduation requirements and/or to be able to earn college credit for the language proficiency acquired in high school.
2 semesters - 2 credits each year

 

Honors & AP World Language Program
Entrance requirements for Honors and AP World Language Program:

'A' average in second level; qualified 'B+' students may be considered
Approval of instructor
Agreement to meet expectations and requirements of Honors contract
Superior oral daily participation in class as verified by previous and current instructor(s)
Completion of an Honors World Language application

Criteria for continuing in Honors and AP World Language Program:
'B' average or above per semester

HONORS FRENCH 3 A & B
This course is open to students who have successfully completed two years of French. It is taught concurrently with French 3. In addition to completing the requirements of the French 3 course, Honors students complete at least one journal writing and and interview or podcast per unit. Students will also have additional readings in French. Each term students will do an independent study project. These can include research about France, contemporary life in France or Francophone countries and advanced use of the language. Honors students are expected to speak French to the instructor, in and outside of class, and when appropriate, to their peers. 2 semesters - 2 credits

HONORS FRENCH 4 A & B
2 semesters - 2 credits

HONORS SPANISH 3 A & B
In this course, students will acquire the skills to write and speak about opinions, descriptions, conjecture, and events in the past, present, and future. The class focuses on developing fluency and accuracy in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Students will use Spanish to investigate and discuss aspects of historic and contemporary Hispanic culture. Students will study topics such as the history of Spain and of the Americas, family and gender roles, and the role religion plays in Hispanic cultures. For each thematic unit, students will participate in conversations; read and discuss literary, historic, or analytical writings; examine and discuss pieces of art or architecture; and practice the grammar that will help them improve their speaking and composition.
2 semesters - 2 credits

AP SPANISH LANGUAGE A & B
This advanced Spanish elective is a rigorous course focusing on reading, writing, speaking and understanding Spanish. Students will study issues such as family relations, health, the environment, sociology, education, economics and leisure activities. Students will engage in discussions about current events and contemporary culture. Students will understand and apply sophisticated language structures—grammar and vocabulary—to maintain a discussion, presentation, or written analysis. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement Spanish Language Exam in the spring. Students must have a strong interest in Spanish.
2 semesters - 2 credits

AP SPANISH LITERATURE & CULTURE A & B
This course is designed to introduce students to the formal study of a representative body of texts from Peninsular Spanish, Latin American and U.S. Hispanic literature.  Students will demonstrate their proficiency in Spanish across the three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretive and presentational) and the five goal areas (communication, cultures, connections, comparisons and communities).  Students will have ongoing and varied opportunities to further develop their proficiencies across the full range of language skills — with special attention to critical reading and analytical writing — and will reflect on the many voices and cultures included in a rich and diverse body of literature written in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: Strong academic performance in AP Spanish Language or Spanish 4              
2 semesters - 2 credits

AP FRENCH A & B
This advanced French elective is a rigorous course focusing on reading, writing, speaking and understanding French. Students will study themes such as global challenges, personal and public identities, science and technology, beauty and aesthetics, family and community and contemporary life. Students with a strong interest in French will benefit from this college level course. 
2 semesters - 2 credits

Contact the Academic Office

Cheri Broadhead
Principal
763-586-6334

Dan Vandermyde
Assistant Principal
763-586-6305

Di Larson
Academic Assistant
763-571-9116 ext. 203

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